hypanis.ru
Warning: session_start() [function.session-start]: Cannot send session cookie - headers already sent by (output started at /home/content/70/7295470/html/includes/defines.php(1) : runtime-created function:7) in /home/content/70/7295470/html/libraries/joomla/session/session.php on line 423

Warning: session_start() [function.session-start]: Cannot send session cache limiter - headers already sent (output started at /home/content/70/7295470/html/includes/defines.php(1) : runtime-created function:7) in /home/content/70/7295470/html/libraries/joomla/session/session.php on line 423

Warning: Cannot modify header information - headers already sent by (output started at /home/content/70/7295470/html/includes/defines.php(1) : runtime-created function:7) in /home/content/70/7295470/html/libraries/joomla/session/session.php on line 426
Why Learn Pet CPR? Diego's Story | Healthy Paws
Get The Poop!

Opt in to receive the Poop on the latest pet care tips and news on upcoming classes.

How did you hear about us? *





Chase Us Online
TwitterLinkedinYelpFacebookGoogleplusFeed
SocialTwist Tell-a-Friend

Diego's Story: Why I Teach Pet First Aid/CPR/Care Classes

October 29, 2007

That was the day that altered my future.Diego

It started out as typical as any other day. I was greeted enthusiastically by my seven-year-old mini Dachshund, Diego. We both had doctor's appointments: Diego for a routine teeth-cleaning and I had an eye exam. We arrived at the vet's at the required time – 9am. Anytime anesthesia is used there is a risk of complications, so I always opt to have the most extensive pre-tests done to insure Diego is in the best health. There were no problems...Diego was in perfect health.

According to protocol, I could have picked Diego up at 2pm, but due to my appointment I was unable to return to the vet's until 5pm. Putting him out for this procedure always unnerved me, so having to wait an additional three hours to pick him up was torturous! To make things worse, there had apparently been an emergency with another dog, and I had to wait 30 minutes before they brought Diego to me.

When the vet tech did bring Diego out, he still seemed heavily sedated. I asked why he was so cold. The tech dismissed my concerns saying "he's just coming off the anesthesia." It didn't seem right to me...he'd never been this groggy ever before, and considering he'd had the extra three hours to recover, I expected him to be a little sleepy, but almost back to normal. But...I was not the expert, so I didn't question her any further.

All the way to my dad's house I felt anxious about Diego's condition. I was trying to convince myself that I was just over-reacting, but when I got home, my dad took one look at Diego and said "he doesn't look right!" I called the vet, but the call went to voicemail. I was panicked. I kept calling until someone answered. I explained that Diego was unresponsive and having trouble breathing. She instructed me to give him the antibiotic they sent with me. I couldn't believe it! I told her there was no way he could swallow a pill...he couldn't even swallow water! Then she said she had to talk to the doctor and I should call back in five minutes. As absurd as this was, I did exactly what she said. When I called again she told me to bring Diego back. At this point I was frantic. I wasn't able to drive, so my dad drove while I held Diego in my lap.

Half way back to the vet's, Diego went limp and stopped breathing. I was sobbing and praying; my dad was running red lights. In desperation, I mistakenly blew into Diego's mouth. Once we got back to the vet's, they worked on him for half an hour, but it was too late. My sweet Diego, my closest companion and beloved pet, was gone.

I was distraught. That was the worst day of my life. I couldn't sleep for weeks. I blamed myself because I didn't know what to do to save him. I didn't know enough to question his condition before I took him from the vet's. I didn't know. I didn't know.

Afterwards, I decided to learn what I could have done to try to save Diego's life. I am now a certified PetTech trainer. My focus is training pet owners in first aid and CPR techniques. Could this knowledge have saved Diego? I'll never know. What I do know is that I will never again stand by helplessly and do nothing. I know that I can help other pet owners avoid the horror I experienced. I know that I can help others be prepared for the unexpected.

Diego's death altered my life, my future. I can now say that the day that first person called to say that what I taught them helped to save the life of their pet came a couple years ago...so I know Diego didn't die in vain.

Would you know what to do?

 

October 29, 2007

That was the day that altered my future.

 

It started out as typical as any other day.  I was greeted enthusiastically by my seven-year-old mini Dachshund, Diego.  We both had doctor’s appointments: Diego for a routine teeth-cleaning and I had an eye exam.  We arrived at the vet’s at the required time – 9am.  Anytime anesthesia is used there is a risk of complications, so I always opt to have the most extensive pre-tests done to insure Diego is in the best health.  There were no problems…Diego was in perfect health.

 

According to protocol, I could have picked Diego up at 2pm, but due to my appointment I was unable to return to the vet’s until 5pm.  Putting him out for this procedure always unnerved me, so having to wait an additional three hours to pick him up was torturous!  To make things worse, there had apparently been an emergency with another dog, and I had to wait 30 minutes before they brought Diego to me.

 

When the vet tech did bring Diego out, he still seemed heavily sedated.  I asked why he was so cold.  The tech dismissed my concerns saying “he’s just coming off the anesthesia.”  It didn’t seem right to me…he’d never been this groggy ever before, and considering he’d had the extra three hours to recover, I expected him to be a little sleepy, but almost back to normal.  But…I was not the expert, so I didn’t question her any further.

 

All the way to my dad’s house I felt anxious about Diego’s condition.  I was trying to convince myself that I was just over-reacting, but when I got home, my dad took one look at Diego and said “he doesn’t look right!”   I called the vet, but the call went to voicemail.   I was panicked.  I kept calling until someone answered.  I explained that Diego was unresponsive and having trouble breathing.  She instructed me to give him the antibiotic they sent with me.  I couldn’t believe it!  I told her there was no way he could swallow a pill…he couldn’t even swallow water!  Then she said she had to talk to the doctor and I should call back in five minutes.  As absurd as this was, I did exactly what she said.  When I called again she told me to bring Diego back.  At this point I was frantic.  I wasn’t able to drive, so my dad drove while I held Diego in my lap.

 

Half way back to the vet’s, Diego went limp and stopped breathing.  I was sobbing and praying; my dad was running red lights.  In desperation, I mistakenly blew into Diego’s mouth.  Once we got back to the vet’s, they worked on him for half an hour, but it was too late.  My sweet Diego, my closest companion and beloved pet, was gone. 

 

I was distraught.  That was the worst day of my life.  I couldn’t sleep for weeks.  I blamed myself because I didn’t know what to do to save him.  I didn’t know enough to question his condition before I took him from the vet’s.  I didn’t know.  I didn’t know.

 

Afterwards, I decided to learn what I could have done to try to save Diego’s life.  I am now a certified PetTech trainer.  My focus is training pet owners in first aid and CPR techniques.  Could this knowledge have saved Diego?  I’ll never know.  What I do know is that I will never again stand by helplessly and do nothing.  I know that I can help other pet owners avoid the horror I experienced.  I know that I can help others be prepared for the unexpected.

 

Diego’s death altered my life, my future.  Now I look forward to the day that first person calls to say that what I taught them helped to save the life of their pet.

 

Would you know what to do?